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SLOVAK and RUSYN ROOTS; GETTING STARTED
A Guide for Researching Your Roots
in the
Slovak and Czech Republics and Other Countries in the Former Austro-Hungarian Empire
by
John A. Hudick
© copyright 1995, 1996, 2002, 2007 by John A. Hudick, all rights reserved.

Revised: June 4, 2002

Note: Since this original article was written in 1995-1996, some of the information has likely changed.
1. You should check for Area Code changes
2. You should check that prices for books and memberships have changed.
3. Some of these companies and services may have gone out of business or moved.

1. DETERMINING THE VILLAGE OF ORIGIN.

For a thorough search for this village you should refer to the book listed in Section 3a, "Finding Your Ancestral Village in Slovakia, Czechy, Ukraine and Hungary in the Former Austro-Hungarian Empire" published by the author of this article.

This is the first step in the operation. You should question the older family members, your parents, your aunts and uncles. The women many times have better memories than the men. The elderly sometimes need to be prompted with questions to jog their memory.

Other sources may be the original Immigration Passport issued in Europe. Persons from Slovakia traveled on Hungarian passports, those from Bohemia and Moravia traveled on Austrian passports. Immigration Passenger lists also listed the town of origin. If you know the date they arrived in America, you can find this information on film.

Church records.
There are usually three records kept for a person, Birth or Baptismal record, Marriage Record, and Death Record. My father's church baptismal record in Pennsylvania contained the names of his parents, spelled the Hungarian way, and the name of their native village in Slovakia. If you are requesting documents, ask the priest if he would be willing to make a photocopy of the original record. Unless you request a photocopy, he will only transcribe the necessary, not all, information on to the official document. Always include a donation to the church when you request. How much? Depends on how much work you expect him to do for you. A simple record, maybe US$10.00 Something where he has to spend time looking for the record if you can't supply an exact date, maybe US$20.00 - 25.00

How do you know if it is Hungarian vs. Slovak spelling? The spelling of the first name is a giveaway.

MALE
English:....... John ...Andrew...Paul.....Michael....Joseph...Steven
Slovak:........Jan.....Andrej..... Pavol...Michal.....Jozef......Stefan
Hungarian:...Janos..Andras.....Pal.......Mihaly.....Jozsef....Istvan

FEMALE
English:.......Anna...Mary....Sophia...Susanna......Tereza....Katherine
Slovak:.......Anna...Maria....Zofia.....Suzana........Terezia...Katarina
Hungarian:..Anna...Maria....Zsofia....Zsuzsanna...Terez......Katalin

 

The old shoe box
Look for other records in the old shoe box on the top shelf of the closet. Remember, that's where they keep the important records like the home deed, old electric bills from the 30's, and WW2 food ration books.. Sometimes you will find birth records and marriage records of the immigrants. My grandmother had written back to her home village and requested her birth certificate and marriage certificate as a requirement for her naturalization application. The birth certificate was written in Latin, somewhat easy to recognize. Any priest can translate this for you. The marriage certificate was written in Hungarian, difficult to translate but possible. Both of these documents listed the village name. Your biggest problem will be deciphering the hand writing. It is usually written in Germanic script, example of which are given in the both books recommended later.

Death Records
Death Records can be helpful. They list the birth place, the names of the person's parents, sometimes their place of origin, and other information. Unfortunately some of the information can be incorrect because the information listed on the death certificate comes from someone else who may give wrong information. It's worth a try. You can get copies of the death certificate from the Department of Vital Statistics or Department of Health from the state where the person died.

There is usually a fee for this service which can be anywhere from $3.00 to $10.00 plus. Look for death certificates in the family shoe box also.

1.1 LATIN BIRTH CERTIFICATE TRANSLATION
The following is a translation or my grandmother's birth certificate from Latin to English. This certificate was issued about 1916. Translation was done in part by Reverend Father Koster of St. Mary's Byzantine Catholic Church in Kinsgton, PA.

For additional help in translating check also John Jaso's Website at: http://yoda.bmi.net/jjaso/

LATIN>.......Lecturis salutem in Domino!
ENGLISH>...To the reader, greetings in the Lord!

L>...Infrascriptus praesentium vigore fidem facio in Matrica Baptisatorum Parochialis Ecclesiae [Parish name] in Dioecesi [ Diocese ] et Comitatu [ ] existentis sequentia iuxta rubricas contineri:
E>...The undersigned by his office testifies that the following is contained in the matricua of Baptism of the Parish of [ name ] in the Diocese of [ name ] and ?Community? of [ ] according to the rules.

L>...Anno Domini millessimo [ written year ] Tomo [ Numeral ] pag. [ page number ]
E>...Year of our Lord, [ written year ] Volume [ Numeral ] Page [ page number ].

L>...Nrus curr.
E>...Entry number. (Usually the serial entry number for the year in the book of Births)

L>...Annus et dies
E>...Year and date.

L>...Nativitatis
E>...Day of Birth

L>...Colatti S. Baptismi
E>...Day of Baptism

L>...Baptisati
E>...Baptismal information

L>...Nomen: Sexus: masc.: foem.: legitim: illegitim
E>...Name: Sex: Male: Female: legitimate? illegitimate?

L>...Nomen parentum, eorum condition, Religio et locus Originis
E>...Name of parents, rank, religion, and place of origin.

L>...Locus domicilii cum Nrus domus
E>...Location of home with house number.

L>...Nomen patrinorum, eorum condition, Religio et locus domicilii
E>...Name of Godparents, rank, religion, and place of residence.

L>...Nomen Baptisantis
E>...Name of Baptist, (Priest)

L>...Observationes
E>...Observations.

L>...In cuius plenam fidem praesentes propria namu subscriptas, et officioso Ecclesiae Sigillo roboratas extradedi, litteras testimoniales.
E>...In Faith, signed by my own hand, confirmed by the official seal of the church, I have issued this testimony (certificate)

L>...Sig [ location of signing ] die [date ] Anno [ year ]
E>...Signed [ location of signing ] Date [date ] Year [ year ]

Some entries:
L>...foem. = female:
L>...masc. = male
L>...plebii = commoners (rank)

 

 

1.2 HUNGARIAN MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE TRANSLATION
The following is a translation or my grandmother's Marriage certificate from Hungarian to English. This certificate was issued in 1916.

HUNGARIAN>...Hazassagi anyakonyvi kivonat
ENGLISH>... ......Marriage Record

H>...anyakonyvi kivonat
E>...Birth Certificate

H>...Kotet
E>...Year

H>...az eperjesi gor. szert. kath. egyhazmegyebe kebelezett [ town name ] egyhaz anyakonyvebol az [ year ] azaz egyezer [ volume number ] evrol.
E>...Extract from the Greek Catholic Church district of [ town name ], the Chruch Recorder's book of the year of [ year ] that corresponds with the [ number of volume ] volume.

H>...Folyoszam
E>...Item number

H>...egybekelesi ideje
E>...date of marriage

H>...valamint szuleiknek, esetleg elobbi hazastarsuknak neve es pogari allasa
E>...Name, Parents name, and occupation

H>...szuletes- es lakhelye. Hazszam
E>...Birthplace and place of residence. House number.

H>...vallasa
E>...religion

H>...eletkora
E>...age

H>...allapota
E>...Status of Marriage

H>...notl. v hajadon
E>...single or widowed

H>...tanuinak neve es allasa
E>...Name of witness and occupation

H>...kihirdetvek-e vagy mely akadalytol folmentvek?
E>...announcements

H>...A hazasito egyhazi szemely neve es allasa
E>...Name and title of priest

H>...Eszrevetel
E>...Comments

H>...Ezen hazassagi anyakonyvi kivonat teljes hiteleul, [ town ] 19__[ month ] day [ ].
E>...On this certified copy of marriage certificate, [ town ], 19 __ [ month ] day of [ ].

Some notations
H>...kileucszor hatovik
E>...Ninety Sixth (volume)

H>...Gr. Kath.
E>...Greek Catholic

H>...Gorog. Kath.
E>...Greek Catholic

H>...R. Kath.
E>...Roman Catholic

H>...fia
E>...son of

H>...la'nya
E>...daughter of

H>...folmoves
E>...farmer (tiller of the soil)

 

 

2. LOCATING TOWNS IN SLOVAKIA AND OTHER COUNTRIES OF THE FORMER AUSTRO-HUNGARIAN EMPIRE

Information needed to find the ancestral village is contained in the book reference listed in Section 3a below.

The following publication will help you locate old towns in Slovakia. This book is on film in the LDS library. Look under the index "HUNGARY, GAZETTEER, Title" There is also a copy of this book in the Library of Congress, Map and Geography reading room.

GAZETTEER CZECHOSLOVAKIA, Official Standard Names
approved by the United States Board of Geographical Names
LDS Film Number TBD
Division of Geography, Dept of the Interior.
(A cross reference from old town names to new.)

 

2.1 MAPS
Refer to the book listed in Section 3a below.

 

3. GENEALOGY RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS
These are some of the better books in print that show how best to find what you are looking for


a. "Finding Your Ancestral Village in Slovakia, Czechy, Ukraine and Hungary in the Former Austro-Hungarian Empire"
By John A. Hudick $16.00 Postpaid
6780 N. Applegate Road
Grants Pass, OR 97527
Website: http://www.slavicroots.com
E-mail: John@slavicroots.com
E-mail: Slovakroots@aol.com


b. "A Handbook of Czechoslovak Genealogy Research" (Currently out of Print)
Daniel M. Schlyter
ISBN 0-912811-06-4
Library of Congress: 85-70512

Genum Publishers
c/o Genealogy Unlimited
P.O. Box 537
Orem, Utah 84059-0537,
Telephone: (800) 666-4363
Web Site: http://feefhs.org/pub/frg-gu.html
This book is available from either Czech genealogy society.

c. "Handy Guide to Hungarian Genealogical Records"
Jared Suess
Everton Publishers
P.O. Box 368
Logan, Utah 84323-0368
Telephone: (800) 443-6325

"In Search of Your European Roots"
Angus Baxter
ISBN number is 0-8063-1446-X
published by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland
Cost is $16.95
I have no knowledge of this book. It was recommended by Margaret Sheremata, Sheremata@qgo.mba.org

4. MORMON CHURCH RECORDS.
The Mormon church has the finest most complete collection of Records available. They have been photographing records all over the world for the past 70+ years, and these records are available to the public.

a. They have a network of Family History Libraries all over the states. In the East you may only find them in the larger cities.
b. You can find a listing in your telephone directory, look under "Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, The - Family History Center"
c. You do not have to be a Mormon to use their libraries.
d. They will not try to convert you to their religion when you visit the library.
e. Use of the library is free.
f. They have an excellent knowledgeable staff, most of whom are into doing their own research.
h. They can order films for you from Salt Lake City at a nominal rental fee, about $4.00 for a 4 week rental, and they can be renewed indefinately.
i. They have a number of film viewing machines and copy machines at their libraries.

4.1 FINDING SLOVAK RECORDS IN THE LDS LIBRARY
Previous to 1918, Slovakia was a part of the Austria-Hungary Empire, and was a part of UPPER HUNGARY. The records for Slovakia are listed in the index under "HUNGARY". Since the revolution in 1989, the Mormon church has resumed filming more of the local records in Czech and Slovak Republics, and they now are being listed under SLOVAK REPUBLIC or CZECH REPUBLIC. A number of the records previously listed under "HUNGARY" now have a duplicate listings under "SLOVAK REPUBLIC or CZECH REPUBLIC". You should check both indexes. Recently the LDS church as filmed the local village parish records of the Slovak and Czech Republics. Bohemian and Moravian records are listed under Austria.

5. CENSUS RECORDS
The census records are available for viewing at either the Mormon Church Family History Centers or at the U.S. Nation Archives Centers located around the U.S. Only the census records from 1790 to 1920 are open to the public. The 1890 census has mostly been destroyed by fire in about 1921. The 1930 census won't be available for viewing until 2001 or so. These centers have publications available that explain census records for each census year. The cost is one dollar each. There is also staff and volunteer docents available to help you if needed.

National Archives Centers are located in:
San Francisco (San Bruno, CA)
Los Angeles (Laguna Niguel, CA)
Seattle
Denver
Chicago
Washington D.C. (Suitland, MD)
New York (Bayonne, NJ)
Boston (Waltham, MA)
Philadelphia
Atlanta (East Point, GA)
Kansas City, MO
Fort Worth, TX

6. PASSENGER LISTS
Refer to the book listed in 3a above

 

7. NATURALIZATION RECORDS
I've never had success with Naturalization records.
a.. Most of my ancestors never became naturalized.
b. I saw hardly any females listed in the naturalization records previous to 1940. That is because only the men were naturalized in the 19th and early 20th centuries and the wife was included in his naturalization.

Naturalization records are available in the county courthouses of some states. In Luzerne County, Pennsylvania they are kept by the Prothonatary's office.
In Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, they are kept in a back room and you have to ask to view them.

There is an excellent book written on researching the naturalization records:

"Locating your Immigrant Ancestor, A Guide to Naturalization Records"
James Neagles and Lila Lee Neagles
Everton Publishers
P.O. Box 368
Logan, Utah 84323-0368
Telephone: (800) 443-6325

 

8. CZECH AND SLOVAK STATE ARCHIVE RECORDS
The place to write to for genealogy research in Slovakia previous to 1900 is the State Archives in Bratislava or Prague. The request/research /billing cycle used to take five months from your request to when you get the information. I understand they have finally wised up and found out they could get more repeat business if they shortened the mail time by using air mail.

For records in the Slovak Republic send your request to:

Ministerstvo Vnutra Slovenskej Republiky
Odbor Archivnictva
Krizkova 7
811 04 Bratislava
Slovak Republic

For records in the Czech Republic send your request to:

Archivni Sprava
Obrancu Miru 133
166 21 Praha 6
Czech Republic

a. List all the pertinent information about the person, name, date of birth, place of birth, mother, father, religion, etc.

b. Request information in the form of "Extract of Birth Record", Extract of Marriage Record", etc.

c. Specifically state that you do not want "Duplicate Birth Certificate", "Duplicate Marriage Certificate", etc., otherwise you will find yourself being billed for duplicate certificates of your ancestors' siblings that you don't want, at $10 .00 apiece.

d. You should request that they research all direct line ancestors and specify a cost limit of so many dollars.

e. Research is surprisingly cheap. An average genealogy report costs $55.00 to $85.00, and includes a report of their research and extracts of birth, marriage, or death records that you requested.

f. When the research is completed they will notify you with an invoice. You should send the remittance to them via International Money Order available from your local bank.

 

9. BLIND LETTERS TO THE ANCESTRAL VILLAGE
If you think you may have relatives in a certain village but are not sure you can write a blind letter and address it to the mayor of that village. Insert a few U.S. Dollars into the envelope, or use two International Postal Reply Coupons, (IPRC's) available for $1.05 each from U.S. Post Offices. Air Mail letter rate to Slovakia is 55 cents for the first 1/2 ounce and 50 cents per additional 1/2 ounce. The address to write to the town mayor of the town of Hostovice in the Humenne District with a zip code of 06735.

In SLOVAK...................................In ENGLISH
Starostovi mesta Hostovice.........Mayor of the town of Hostovice
06735 Hostovice........................Hostovice 06735 [this is the ZipCode]
Okres Humenne.........................Humenne District
Slovak Republic.........................Slovak Republic

Be sure that the U.S. Postal clerk understands that this is going to the Slovak Republic, (U.S. Postal Country ID number 333) and not to Slovenia, which is a part of the old Yugoslavia. Just to be sure, I usually write "CZECHOSLOVAKIA" at the bottom of the address.

You can find the zip code for any town by going to:

http://escapeartist.com/global10/zip.htm

 

 

The following is a letter I wrote to the Mayor of the village of my ancestors. The first is in English and the second is the translation in Slovak

To the Mayor of the town of [ village name ]
District of [ ]
Slovakia

If there are any persons in [ Slovak village name ] with the family name [ enter family names ], please give this letter to them.

My name is { your name }. I am the grandchild of { Grandmother } and { Grandfather } who came to America in {year of immigration } and lived in { state }. I have been investigating my family ancestors and would like to communicate with [ family name ] family members who live in [ Slovak village name ].

I live in near [ your nearest major city ], in [ your town ] , [ your state ] . I am [ age ] years old. I am a university graduate with a degree in [ your degree ]. I work as a { your occupation }

I would like to hear from you. Please write to me. Tell me about yourself and your family. Tell me about the town of [ village name ], what kind of town it is, the people, how many people, it's farms, the church, the mountains, it's industry and so forth.

There is a possibility that I may visit Slovakia and [ village name ] this summer.

I am sending two International Reply Coupons for your reply postage. You should exchange them at your post office for stamps.

If you can make your reply in English it would be helpful to me because I do not know the Slovak language. This letter was designed for those people who do not understand Slovak.

Sincerely,

For the following letter, the diacritical marks are lost in e-mail transmission. If you would like a copy of this letter, send a SASE (Self Adressed Stamped Envelope) to me at my address listed below. Mention "Slovak letter".

Starostovi mesta [ village name ]
Okres [ District name ]
Slovensko

Vazena
Ak su v [ Slovak village name ] osoby, ktore maju priezvisko [ family names ], odovzdajte im prosim vas tento list.

Ja sa volam [ your name ]. Som vnuk [ Grandmother (GM) ] a [ Grandfather (GF) ] , ktorii prisli do Ameriky v roku [ year of immigration ] a zili v [ state ]. Robim si vykum o predkoch mojej rodiny a rad by som sa spojil s clenmi [ GF family name ] a [ GM family name ] rodiny, ktori ziju v [ Slovak village name ].

Zijem blizko [ your nearest major city ], v meste [ your town ] v [ your state ]. Mam [ your age ] rokov. Mam skoncene univerzitne vzdelanie v odbore [ your degree ].

Pracujem ako [ your occupation ].

Prosis by som Vas, keby ste mi odpisali. Napiste mi o sebe a o svojej rodine. napiste mi o meste (obce) [village name ] a o tom, ake je to mesto, aki l'udia tam ziju, kol'ko ma obyvatel'ov a podobne. tiez by som rad vedel, ake su tam polia, hory, priemysel, atd'.

Je celkom mozne, ze tohto leta navstivim Slovensko.

Posielam Vam dva Medzinarodne predplatene postove kupony na znamky. Tieto kupony sa daju vymenit na poste za znamky.

Obracian sa na Vas prostrednictvom listu, ktory bol zostaveny pre osoby, co nevedia po slovensky. Ak Vasa odpoved' bude v anglictine, privitam to, lebo patrim prave k tym, ktori po slovensky nevedia.

s uprimnym pozdravom,

[ your name ]

Sending money to relatives, especially cash, is risky. I recommend that you send a International Money Order. They would prefer cash however, and will stuff their matress with it. I have sent money both methods and in one case I mailed three letters each with a $20 bill each going to a different town, and none arrived.

 

10. RESEARCHING IN EUROPE

State Regional Archive Centers
Archival Records previous to 1895-1900 are stored at regional state archive centers. For the old county of Zemplen and Saris, they are stored in Presov. For the old county of Szepes (Spis), they are stored in Lubica. These centers are open to the public by making prior arrangements or by having the right connections, it is possible to visit and look at the records.

(From Schlyter) The cities that have regional offices that have the old records are in:
Banska Bystrica
Bratislava
Brno Mesto (city)
Bytca
Jablonec
Janovice
Kosice
Litomerice
Lubica
Nitra
Opava
Plzen
Praha
Praha mesto (Prague)
Presov
Trebon
Zamrsk

 

Local Parish Records
The records from 1895-1900 to the present are still with the priests of the local villages. When I visited Slovakia in the summer of 1994 I visited with the priests of my two ancestral villages. In both cases the priests were very accommodating by letting me look through their record books. These record books which are nearly 100 years old are the ones they still use to record births, deaths, and marriages today.

The record book column titles are in Hungarian. The entries are in Slovak up until about 1920. From 1920 to about the mid 1960's the records are in written Cyrillic. I could not read the Cyrillic. The priest could read them, but he had to study them first. It was very time consuming. It is proper to offer a donation to this church for this privilege.

I have not had good success with writing to the local parishes for information. Consider that priests are not researchers, they are priests. Also they may have to care for more than one village, and can be quite busy. I had written three letters to priests and enclosed money as a donation. Needless to say, none of the letters were received. It's almost like the USA return address addressed to a Church is a flag to suggest there is money inside.

Civil Records
In the village I visited, the mayor had a book, a "Family Register", which the Communist government required them to keep. The names of each family and children are listed by their address. This record keeping started about 1948. This is a good way to check to see if any of your family still lives in the village. I was certainly surprised to find mine.

 

11. GENEALOGY SOCIETIES AND PERIODICALS
These are the Slovak, Polish and Hungarian Genealogy Societies and Clubs that I know about, there are possibly more. These clubs are very informative and both publish newsletters. If you know of more please inform me.

California Czech and Slovak Club (CCSC)
P.O. Box 20452
Castro Valley, California 94546-8542
Publishes a newsletter, NOVINY, bi-monthly Memberships: Single $15.00 Family US$20.00
Telephone: (510) 581-9986
FAX (510) 581-0213

Czechoslovak Genealogy Society International (CGSI) (http://www.cgsi.org)
P.O. Box 16225
St. Paul, Minnesota 55116-0225
Memberships: Single US$15.00, Family US$20.00
Publishes an bi-monthly newsletter, Nase Rodina . Publications
of Czech and Slovak Surnames are available, as well as a genealogy kit.

Polish Genealogical Society of California (PGSCA)
P.O. Box 713
Midway City, California 92655-0713

Polish Genealogical Society of America (PGSA)
984 North Milwaukee Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60622

Hungarian-American Friendship Society (HAHS) (http://www.dholmes.com)
Doug Holmes

Publishes a bi-monthly newsletter Regi Magyarorszag("Old Country")

The Slovak Heritage and Folklore Society International
It publishes an excellent newsletter quarterly: Slovakia
Memberships: US$10.00 per year, Founders: Helene Cincebeaux and Helen Baine

The Slovak Heritage & Folklore Society International founded in 1986 by Helene Cincebeaux and Helen Zemek Baine, provides and shares information on Slovak heritage from history and culture to music, art, folk dress, folk art, customs, crafts and genealogy. The quarterly publicizes people, events of interest, services, courses, tips on travel to Slovakia, and how to find long-lost relatives. A LINK serves helps in simple translations and letters to the old country.
Info:
Helene Cincebeaux
151 Colebrook Drive
Rochester, New York 14617-2215
Telephone or FAX: (716) 342-9383
eMail address: helenezx@aol.com
make check payable to Helen Baine

The Moravian Heritage Society (MHS) (http://feefhs.org/czs/frg-mohs.html)
publishes an excellent newsletter quarterly: Morava Krasna"
Memberships: US$10.00 per year
Co-directors Tom Hrncirik, A.G. and Helene Cincebeaux
Info:
Tom Hrncirik
31910 Road 160
Visalia, California 93292
Telephone: (209) 798-1490
or
Helene Cincebeaux
Telephone or FAX: (716) 342-9383

The Slovak Heritage and Cultural Society of British Columbia
publishes a excellent quarterly newsletter: Slovak Heritage Live
ISSN 1198-6077
Memberships: Single $15.00, Family $20.00
Info: Vladimir Linder
3804 Yale Street
Burnaby, British Columbia
Canada V5C 1P6
Telephone: (604) 291-8065
FAX: (604) 291-1966
eMail: vlinder@direct.ca

Carpatho-Rusyn Research Center
This is a non-profit cultural research organization in Orwell, Vermont whose purpose is to promote knowledge about all aspects of Carpatho-Rusyn culture through the publication and distribution of scholarly and educational material about the Carpatho-Rusyn heritage in Europe and America. They publish a forum on Carpatho-Rusyn Heritage: The Carpatho-Rusyn American, ISSN 0749-9213. This quarterly publication available for an annual cost of US$12.00 per year. General inquires and communications should be directed to:
Carpatho-Rusyn American
P.O. Box 131B
Orwell, Vermont 05760

 

BOOKS ABOUT RUSYNS IN EUROPE AND AMERICA
Carpatho-Rusyn Research Center
P. O. Box 131-B
Orwell, Vermont 05760

12 INTERNET RESOURCES

12.1 NEWSGROUPS

INTERNET NEWSGROUPS
Genealogy:
soc.genealogy.slavic
soc.genealogy.misc
soc.genealogy.computing
soc.genealogy.german
alt.genealogy

Culture (some groups permit genealogy messages):
soc.culture.czecho-slovak
soc.culture.polish
soc.culture.magyar
soc.culture.ukranian
soc.culture.russian
soc.culture.romanian

12.2 WEBSITE HOME PAGES

INTERNET RESOURCES

Federation of East European Family History Societies (FEEFHS)
http://www.feefhs.org

Refer to the book listed in Section 3a above for a list of Internet Resources

Northeast Pennsylvania Genealogical Society at [http://home.ptd.net/~tamlamb/gene.htm] provides information, as well as links to other genealogy groups, homepages, etc.
Operated by John and Tammy Lamb
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania
Lamb's eMail address: tamlamb@postoffice.ptd.net

13. LANGUAGE TAPES and DICTIONARIES

A. "Slovak Language Laboratory Course", by Bonaventure S. Buc.
Two tapes and a instruction manual. US$13.00 + S&H
Jednota Press
P.O. Box 150
Middletown, Pennsylvania 17057-0150
Telephone: (717) 944-0461

B. AUDIO FORUM LANGUAGE COURSE An excellent Slovak
language course is available from Audio-Forum. It includes a 522-page instruction manual and 8 audio cassette tapes.

"Beginning Slovak: A Course for the Individual or Classroom Learner".
By Oscar E. Swan and Sylvia Galova-Lorinc

Audio Forum Language tapes (8 in set) including the book below
Cost: about US$175.00

Audio-Forum
96 Broad Street
Guilford, Connecticut 06437
Telephone: (203) 453-9794
FAX: (203) 453-9774

Audio-Forum will sell the book separately for US$35.00.

The book alone may be available directly from the publisher.
Beginning Slovak, Oscar E. Swan and Sylvia Galova-Lorinc

Slavica Publishers, Inc.
P.O. Box 14388
Columbus OH 43214
about US$35.00

C. "Slovak Phrase Book and Audio Tape"
by Sylvia Galova Lorinc and Stephen R. Hoferka, Jr.
An 82 page soft-cover book that contains hundreds of words and phrases with the Slovak translation side-by-side. Book US$9.00, Tape US$9.00, Book and Tape, US$17.00, all postpaid. PA residents add sales tax.
I have been informed that Mr. Hoferka is not to be found lately, but here is his listing at your own risk.

Send Check or Money Order to:
Stephen R. Hoferka
232 E. Agnew Ave
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15210

D. "THE PRACTICAL SLOVAK ENGLISH DICTIONARY"
Author: Edward Kovac, Jr.
Jednota Press
P.O. Box 150
Middletown, Pennsylvania 17057-0150
Telephone: (717) 944-0461

E. "BASIC SLOVAK"
Author: Jozef Mistrik
ISBN: 80-08-01333-8
Slovenske Pedagogicke Nakladatelstvo
Sasinkova 5b
815 60 Bratislava
Slovakia

This textbook of Slovak is written for English speaking students. It is written in English

F. "SLOVAK FOR SLAVICISTS"
Authors: P. Balaz, M. Darovec, H. Trebaticka
Slovenske Pedagogicke Nakladatelstvo
Sasinkova 5b
815 60 Bratislava
Slovakia

This is the book used at the Defense Language Institute, Monterey, California.

G. "ENGLISH-SLOVAK & SLOVAK-ENGLISH POCKET DICTIONARY"
Anglicky-Slovensky a Slovensko-Anglicky VreckovySlovnik
Slovenske Pedagogicke Nakladatelstvo
Sasinkova 5b
815 60 Bratislava
Slovakia

This is the book used at the Defense Language Institute, Monterey, California.

H. "HUNGARIAN-ENGLISH DICTIONARY"
Magyar-Anglo Szotar
Author: Orszagh, Laszlo
Kiadja az Akademiai Kiado
Budapest
Hungary
This comes in two volumes, Hungarian->English. and English->Hungarian. I found this in the Stanford University Bookstore.

I. "HUNGARIAN - ENGLISH and ENGLISH - HUNGARIAN Dictionary"
Hippocrene Concise Dictionary.
This dictionary is inadequate and NOT RECOMMENDED.

14. OTHER RECOMMENDED READING
For a description of family life and work conditions of the Slovak immigrants in the coal mining towns read:

"THE KINGDOM OF COAL"
Authors: Donald L. Miller & Richard E. Sharpless,
Univ. of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia.
about US$30.00

"ON THE LOOSE IN EASTERN EUROPE"
Written by the Berkeley Students in cooperation with the Association of Students of the University of California.
About US$16.00
ISBN 0-679-02223-6
Published by FODOR'S TRAVEL PUBLICATIONS, INC.
A fantastic guide that covers Czech and Slovakia Republics, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Romania. It covers the various aspects of planning your trip, coming, going and staying in the country. It has maps of cities, rail and metro public transportation maps, maps showing lodging, descriptions of lodging, places to see. You can't travel without it.

I am told it is hard to find this book, but if you can it is a treasure.

 

15. SLOVAK TRANSLATION

Slovak Translation: Contact: http://www.dholmes.com/janatran.html
Hungarian Translation: Contact: http://www.hungariantranslation.com
Hungarian Translation: Contact: prosbikiren@yahoo.com
Romanian Translation: Contact: prosbikiren@yahoo.com
Polish Translation: TBD

16. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

PHONEBOOK SEARCHES

SURNAME SEARCHES IN SLOVAK AND CZECH PHONEBOOKS
A phonebook search service of Slovakia and the Czech Republic with reasonable rates. Andrew has a collection of the 18 phone books of Slovakia.

This service was suspended on 11 September 1996 due to the illness of Andrew Fabula.
At this time I am unaware of his condition or his services.

 

17. APPENDIX OF ARTICLES

SELECTED ARTICLES:

"What is a Rusyn, anyway?"
Richard D. Custer, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

"Researching the People from 'No Man's Land' "
The Carpatho-Rusyns of Austria-Hungary by Thomas A. Peters, C. G. R. S. of Totowa, New Jersey

"A bonanza for Rusyn Family History!"
by Andrew Fabula of La Jolla, California

John A. Hudick
385 Dexter Way

Grants Pass, OR 97527

oregonjohn@oigp.net

john@slavicroots.com

http://www.slavicroots.com

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